Justice

Adorers Commit to Green Energy

The Adorers of the Blood of Christ take seriously our beliefs cited in our Land Ethic, which include honoring the sacredness of all creation and reverencing Earth as a sanctuary where all life is protected.

As an international community of religious women, we have witnessed to this Land Ethic by hosting an Earth Summit in Ruma, Illinois; resisting gold mining in Guatemala; and for the past three years, by standing in resistance to the plans of Transco/Williams’ to install and operate a massive fracked gas export pipeline on the very land we hold sacred in Lancaster County,

Adorers to Announce Supreme Court Appeal & Solar Farm Dream at Press Conference

Friday, Sept. 7, 2018 @ 9 a.m.
Outdoor Chapel at 3939 Laurel Run
Columbia, Pennsylvania 17512

After three years of resistance to keep a climate-warming, fracked-gas pipeline off their land in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, the Adorers of the Blood of Christ are entering an exciting new phase of their spirited struggle to affirm the sacredness of Creation.

Their plan is twofold: (1) to advance their legal challenge against the power of the gas industry; and, (2) to pursue a dream of offering an alternative to climate-warming fossil fuels.

Looking for Sure Footing

By Sister Regina Siegfried, ASC

The biggest news stories of recent days expose the human failings in our government and the Catholic Church, really, about the scandal bubbling up in both institutions.

“Scandal,” a word borrowed from Latin and Greek words, means a “cause of moral stumbling.”

Who’s stumbling?

Are the guilty stumbling because of their moral failings? Or are ordinary Catholics and U.S. citizens slipping in the mud and muck caused by clericalism and political power mongering?

Where is our sure footing?

It’s probably not mere coincidence that the moral failings of both the Church in the U.S.

Helping God Answer Prayers of Human Trafficking Victims

By Sister Kate Reid, ASC

The World Day Against Trafficking on Monday has passed, but trafficking knows no calendar, and the need for vigilance continues. These days, I’m thinking a lot about clients I helped climb out of the human hell of trafficking.

This summer, I retired after 15 years of the most gratifying ministry I’ve ever had. I worked for the Immigration Law Program of Legal Services of Eastern Missouri in St. Louis, which provides free legal representation for poor people. I represented hundreds of immigrants who needed help applying for immigration benefits.

Good, Goodness, and Grace

By Sister Regina Siegfried, ASC

Two small and little-known organizations in St. Louis have given me pause to reflect on how good grows from goodness. 

The Immigrant and Refugee Women’s Program, housed in an Episcopal church’s parish hall basement, provides English teachers for immigrant and refugee women as they learn to navigate American culture and the English language.

The women who staff the program are competent, compassionate, caring, and concerned about their students and teachers.  Each teacher is matched with a student and provided with the trademark teacher’s bag full of notebooks,