community

What I’ve Gained from Entering Religious Life

By Sister Angela Laquet, ASC

People may wonder why Sisters choose religious life when such a journey involves giving up what others take for granted.

For instance, Sisters cannot accumulate wealth (vow of poverty) or marry (vow of chastity), although in some cases, they may adopt children.

But what religious life takes away, it gives back in spades. I doubt I would be as fully formed a person without the many blessings of religious life.

Here are just some of the things I’ve gained in the process:

  1. Using my Gifts.

Pokémon Go, Pokémon Reset

By Sister Krystal Funk

Today, when I saw a young man standing at the end of the driveway to our novitiate, I knew immediately that he was playing Pokémon Go.

I’ve stood in the same place playing the same game.

I shouted out my car window, “what team are you on?”  He responded, “Team Yellow!”

I said, “I am one of the sisters who lives here, I’ll be up soon!  I am Team Red!”

Having fun; setting limits

I have been viewing videos recently that show large groups of people gathered in one place to play the game.

Fire, Wind, Words of Pentecost

By Sister Regina Siegfried, ASC

The reading from the Acts of the Apostles for the feast of Pentecost describes the cowering disciples, huddled together and totally confused about what will happen to the followers of Jesus.

Then the fireworks begin.

  • There’s wind, tongues of fire, sounds of many languages, and a lot of milling around, with the disciples eager to get outside to speak to a gathering crowd.
  • It becomes a reverse tower of Babel, since the people outside understand the message, even if they don’t comprehend the language about “the mighty acts of God.”

God’s good Spirit comes in many ways;

Urban Gardening

By Sister Regina Siegfried, ASC 

Gardeners are happily digging, planting, seeding and weeding these days. Community garden plots are a particular love of mine because they green our urban landscape in empty lots and pocket parks.

In community gardens, neighbors share small sections or raised beds for their individual tomato, beans, squash, herbs and other plants, all set into soil with hope, anticipation and promise. Such gardens are growing in popularity as a means to provide food for a family.

Community gardening sprang into life for me over the last few weeks when groups of people visited a small back yard I share with others to help get the 6-foot-by-12-foot garden plots prepared and planted.

Finding Community

By Sister Regina Siegfried, ASC          

On a recent weekend in October, my St. Louis neighborhood was the setting for the Historic Shaw Art Fair. A myriad of Shaw residents volunteers to make the fair a success.

Artists positioned their booths along the green space that runs along the middle of Flora Place, a beautiful tree-lined boulevard in one of the oldest intact neighborhoods of St. Louis. The huge houses on either side of the two-block art fair are as much works of art as the selections in the booths.

october-red-maple-1350039

The weather was chilly,

Touchy Topic Tuesday: Nextdoor

By Sr. Regina Siegfried ASC

Nextdoor is a social networking service for neighborhoods in the United States.  I imagine it as a huge backyard fence or kitchen table over which neighbors can chat, exchange items, and keep a vigilant eye on each other.

It might be a limping excuse for an actual face-to-face conversation, but it does serve a purpose in our social-networking culture. Nextdoor Shaw is my local service that keeps our neighborhood informed of events, lost pets, suspicious activity, and free items placed in alleys for anyone who wants them.

shawAlthough the tone is generally civil and courteous,