International

Korea’s Division

With Korea very much in the news, we turn to Sister Bernadine Wessel, ASC, who worked there from 1977 to 2013, teaching conversational English to children and adults; translating for migrant workers and encouraging them; and working with children.

By Sister Bernadine Wessel, ASC

We in the West are accustomed to hearing the terms North and South Korea, a division that occurred at the end of World War II.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, Korea was under the control of Japan, which tried to make Korea and Koreans Japanese.

The Pilgrimage Begins

Fearday (1)By Sister Anita (Anitawa) Fearday, ASC

Twenty kilometers a day. 70 years old. Traveling the Way of St. James in Spain. Next week I begin my pilgrimage.

The Way of St. James was one of the most important Christian pilgrimages during the Middle Ages, together with those to Rome and Jerusalem.

Legend holds that St. James’s remains were carried by boat from Jerusalem to northern Spain, where he was buried in what is now the city of Santiago de Compostela.

Our Life’s Pilgrimage

By Sister Anita Fearday, ASC

I often have thought of life as a pilgrimage, especially when I am in touch with a yearning, a hunger, a desire for something more in life.

For 70 years, I have been on the way to a more abundant life, but I have not yet reached the pot of gold of John 10, 10 (“I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full.”)

As I mark my 70 years of life and 50 years as a Sister,

War, Women and Girls: A Special Kind of Violence

By Sr. JoAnn Mark, ASC

A little more than a year ago, I moved from my university job at Newman University in Wichita, Kan., to run an NGO (non-governmental organization) in New York. In my work for Partnership for Global Justice, I frequently attend meetings at the United Nations.

You get numb to them after a while. But one particular meeting in March left me feeling overwhelmed. The topic was the inhumane treatment of women and girls, including rape and sexual violence in war.

I came to understand that sexual violence, unlike torture,

What I miss most about Korea

By Sister Bernadine Wessel, ASC 

The people. The relationships formed by living, working, struggling, crying, laughing and praying together… that’s what I miss most about Korea.

I spent time with so many different kinds of people during my 36 years ministering in Korea, and they each taught me lessons that broadened my worldview and formed me into the person I am today.

I spent the longest period of time in Korea ministering at Blessed Mother daycare/kindergarten.   My years of teaching previously in the States had been mostly in the middle grades. In Korea,

Quills and Keyboards

By Sr. Janet McCann, ASC

I recently had the opportunity to travel to Acuto, Italy, where my community, the Adorers of the Blood of Christ, was founded by St. Maria De Mattias in 1834. (Learn more about the Adorers’ foundress and history here.)

I was there to help review proposals for funding formation and ministry projects for Adorers throughout the world, and to disburse funding. But I also found time to enjoy the beauty all around those of us gathered at the meeting.

The visit offered lots of contrasting images:

Today’s To-Do List: Tackle Global Problems

world enviornmentday

By Cheryl Wittenauer

Two months after leaving Newman University and Wichita, Sr. JoAnn Mark, ASC is settling into her new digs in Bethpage, N.Y., a Long Island suburb that is about an hour’s commute from the United Nations in upper Manhattan.

As the new executive director of the Partnership for Global Justice, Sr. JoAnn is rebuilding the NGO’s membership, finances and partner networks. She treks to the U.N. at least once a week for meetings.

joAnnMarkThe Partnership educates the public and consults to the U.N.

Easter Eggs Remind Educators of Creative Possibilities

By Sr. Kris Schrader, ASC

The teachers at the Maria De Mattias Education Institute, a high school in rural Guatemala, come together to do the inner work necessary to support their mission to their students.

Beginning the school year with reflection, sharing and creating crafts, they considered “the heart of the matter” that calls us and gives meaning to what we do.

At the beginning of the second quarter, we looked back on the experiences of the first term, and focused in on the now. We used Easter egg creations and reflections to remind ourselves of the myriad hidden possibilities within us and the youth charged to our care.

A Guatemalan Village’s Long Walk to Justice

By Sisters Dani Brought and Kris Schrader

Last week, we walked the Way of the Cross from the Guatemalan village of El Carrizal, San Pedro Ayampuc to La Puya, the entrance to a controversial gold mine that has prompted a now three-year-long nonviolent resistance protest at the site.

We walked 3 miles with the men, women and children who live nearby and have carried out that peaceful protest.

Walking the way of the cross, Guatemala

Along that route, from their town to the mine’s entrance, we prayed the Way of the Cross, connecting their experience of exploitation and human rights abuses with that of Jesus,