Creation Care

Press Release: Halted Construction on the Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline

 

The Adorers are extremely pleased that the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit temporarily halted all construction activity by Transco on the Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline effective immediately. The Order was a preliminary response to the Emergency Motion for Stay filed by the Allegheny Defense Project and other organizations, including Lancaster Against Pipelines, concerned that FERC improperly evaluated the environmental impacts of the Pipeline. The D.C. Circuit Court’s Order stayed the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s Order approving the Pipeline to allow the Court time to consider the Emergency Motion. The Adorers hope that a permanent stay will be entered because environmental science confirms the development of this massive fossil fuel pipeline will only accelerate global warming and harm God’s sacred earth.

Reaction to Judge’s Decision in Pipeline Case

 

The Adorers are disappointed with the recent decision of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania allowing Transco to take immediate possession of their property, even though Transco has not yet obtained all of the permits and approvals that it requires to commence construction of the Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline.

The Adorers continue to pursue their independent claim that the use of their property for the Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline would violate their right to religious exercise as protected by the Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

 

A “Beautiful Order” Happens When We Respect Creation

Sister Janet McCann, ASC delivered this reflection on Sunday, July 9, at the dedication of the Lancaster Against Pipelines ‘chapel’ on Adorers of the Blood of Christ land in Columbia, Pennsylvania, under which a gas pipeline will be built.
Sister Janet McCann, ASC

In the name of the United States Region of the Adorers of the Blood of Christ, I thank you for gracing our farmland with your presence here today.

The sisters and I at DeMattias Residence were talking about this reflection at dinner yesterday.

Each of Us Can Do Something to Avert Climate Change

 

By Sister JoAnn Mark, ASC

Sister JoAnn is executive director of the Partnership for Global Justice, a coalition of individuals and groups that educate and advocate for justice, oppressed people and Earth.  

It’s been nearly a month since President Trump announced the U.S. would withdraw from the Paris Climate Accord, which is so important for the life of all of us and of future generations.

The agreement represents the first time in our lifetime that nearly every nation has offered a voluntary plan to help save the planet by cutting carbon and methane emissions.

Night Crawlers Get Lost

By Sister Regina Siegfried, ASC

Night crawlers, those long, big worms, fascinate me.

You often see them on sidewalks and streets after a rain. Sometimes they’re dead, desiccated, and shriveled. That makes me sad. If I see that they’re still alive, I return them to the grass or dirt so that they can live.

Night crawlers are blind and deaf, so they navigate their earthy home by vibrations. Maybe that’s why a heavy rainstorm drives them above ground. Perhaps the pulsation from the rain causes them to flee the safety of underground existence to dry out on pavement.

Urban Gardening

By Sister Regina Siegfried, ASC 

Gardeners are happily digging, planting, seeding and weeding these days. Community garden plots are a particular love of mine because they green our urban landscape in empty lots and pocket parks.

In community gardens, neighbors share small sections or raised beds for their individual tomato, beans, squash, herbs and other plants, all set into soil with hope, anticipation and promise. Such gardens are growing in popularity as a means to provide food for a family.

Community gardening sprang into life for me over the last few weeks when groups of people visited a small back yard I share with others to help get the 6-foot-by-12-foot garden plots prepared and planted.

Mysteries in Cancer and in the Garden

By Sister Janis Yaekel, ASC

I am Sister Janis Yaekel, ASC and I have pancreatic cancer. In fact, I have lived with cancer since 2012. I hope to share in my blog my journey and my reflections on the presence of God in my life. It is my hope that those who read my entries will find strength for their own journeys. 

I’ve learned on this journey with cancer to expect surprises, and received a big one on Easter Monday.

When I went to my appointment that day, I learned I would not be undergoing chemotherapy,

Lenten Journeys: #CarbonFast2016

By Sister M. Alan Wurth, ASC

Catholics of a certain age will remember abstaining from meat on Fridays throughout the year, but today the rule applies only to Fridays of Lent, hence, the plethora of Lenten fish fries. The discipline of fast and abstinence remains, however, and is universal, not restricted to Catholics.

The Anglican Communion Environmental Network adds a twist to the Lenten fast by encouraging people to fast from carbon, or at least to reduce carbon use during the holy season of Lent. Who knows? The Lenten discipline may create a new lifestyle and enrich our spiritual life.

Fracking: Why It Matters

WurthMABy Sister M. Alan Wurth, ASC

So what’s all the noise about fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, a type of commercial drilling that’s been around for 65 years?

Fracking, combined with something called horizontal drilling, has made extraction of U.S. oil and natural gas easier, resulting in a surge in their production.

Is that good? Let’s take a look.

The advanced drilling technology allows for deeper wells with horizontal arms. Large volumes of water mixed with sand and chemicals are forced under high pressure into those horizontal oil wells to fracture oil-containing rock formations.

Lights During Daytime

By Sr. Regina Siegfried, ASC

from freeimages.comA couple of years ago, I started to document “Life in Ordinary Time” through photos that capture the everyday images – throughout the seasons — of my yard, garden and surrounding Shaw neighborhood, as well as nearby Tower Grove Park.

I sat on my front steps one sunny, dusty Fall afternoon waiting for my neighbor, Paul, to deliver free, energy-efficient porch light bulbs that were donated by our electric company.

While I waited, I watched Danny and Bryan, two good neighbors, blow leaves from the sidewalks into the street.